September 2, Tuesday Evening -- Reading William Duckworth

At the main branch of City College, near the Balboa Park Bart Station. It's a really beautiful campus--one one side is a view of San Bruno Mountain, on the other (this side) is a view of Mount Davidson, which I walked up after talking to him. ...doesn't it sort of beckon you? I was going to sit at the top and read my own book--The Time Traveler's Wife, by Audrey Niffenegger, which my sister loaned me, but by the time I found my way to the top--some of the trails were blocked off and I had a few false starts--it was getting dark.

Reading A Creative Approach to Music Fundamentals, by William Duckworth. He's taking keyboard classes, too. If he were to write a book, it'd be about his life--the traveling he's been on, his hiatus from school, what he's been through.

What have you read about music, be it fiction or nonfiction?

5 Comments:

Ms. B. said...

The Piano Tuner. It's a novel set in Burma, I think, in the later 1800's (can't remember that exactly either!)and the premise of the book is that a man must go tune a piano in the far reaches of the country. I learned so much about the history of the country from reading this, which is how I get much of my history now. The music part was actually secondary.

Anonymous said...

I was a music major in college, so I have read quite a bit of non-fiction on music. Heck, I read a lot of music, period!

KennethSF said...

I read the Piano Tuner too, especially because I grew up in Burma. I thought the recreation of the colonial era was quite accurate, but I'm not sure about the author's portrayal of the Burmese girl. She seemed a bit too bold, too friendly with strangers and foreigners. that's a bit inconsistent with how an 18th century Burmese girl would have behaved. Nevertheless, it still is a wonderful novel.

Ms. B. said...

Kennethsf, thank you so much for clarifying for me! I do try, when reading novels, to know that we bring more than just history to them...and especially sometimes we like to make today more relevant to the past than it was--like women being more individuals and strong-- so it's appreciated that I get your view.

It was one of those novels that I really liked, almost more after I finished it because I continued to think about it, but I also felt I was missing parts of it too. Catcher in the Rye left me feeling that way as a kid.

alex said...

it does beckon me. happy birthday.