July 28, Monday afternoon -- Reading Leo Tolstoy

At the Crocker Galleria
Reading The Death of Ivan Ilyich, by Leo Tolstoy. His mother gave it to him a while ago and today, he was in the city and had time to read, so he thought he'd bring it along.

His mother reads short stories. He's given her The Best American Short Stories, published by Houghton Mifflin.

His favorite books--The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger.

What books that address mortality do you recommend?

7 Comments:

Anonymous said...

Muriel Spark's "Momento Mori."

Sean said...

I know I'm not answering your question, but I have to say that for some unknown reason, I absolutely love the last photo.

Ms. B. said...

And the "Ladies of the Club", a book I have mentioned before addresses a person's, really two, life and death is the end result, so I'm counting that as an answer.

There are also some in my classroom library, one called "Love, Ruby Lavender" and another "Walk Two Moons" that both deal, at a middle school level, with losing loved ones and how to go on. Another, "Words of Stone", asks the question, at least to me, is it better to have a loving mother and lose her or to have a mother but one who doesn't care.....

So, mortality? But, my answer.

Now, I need to look at the last photo to see why sean likes it so much. I like seeing out of other's perspectives. thanks!

Jess said...

Man's Search for Meaning by Frankl.

dave said...

How do you approach someone who is reading? If it were me, I know I would be incredibly self-conscious about what the other person might think of me. I love what you do and definitely encourage you to keep it up.

Honour said...

Oh yes, must agree with Jess. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl for sure. And, Night by Elie Wiesel

rayshauna gray. said...

heidegger's being and time & camus' the stranger